Every two years the district can be awarded an ODA grant to get soil and water projects on the ground in a single watershed. So how do we measure success? We count the number of projects that were completed to solve the biggest problem in that watershed.

Our good news is that this is our most successful Focus Area ever. We have done more work, in more places, than we have ever done before.  In fact, to date in this biennium we have done almost four times as many projects as in the last three bienniums combined! 

To reduce the amount of soil that washes into irrigation ditches and waterways, the district funded 14 different practices.

Eight practices were funded for livestock producers, including animal trails, brush management, forage and biomass, drywells, fencing, heavy use area, piping, and roof runoff containment. These projects have saved soil and water in the Mill Creek Watershed.  

Five practices assisted crop producers: irrigation, irrigation water management, cover crop and conservation cover. These water-saving projects also save energy.

Two practices will be used in restoration in Mill Creek: brush management and herbaceous weed control.  All the practices combined make Mill Creek a success story.

Local farmers dedicated to saving soil and water, together with a strong technical staff whose goal is to get conservation projects on the ground, have made it possible.